Moral Reconation Therapy—MRT® Defined

ABOUT MRT

 

 The term "moral" refers to moral reasoning  based on Kohlberg's levels of cognitive reasoning.  The word "reconation" comes from the psychological terms "conative" and "conation," both of which refer to the process of making conscious decisions.  MRT is a cognitive-behavioral treatment system that leads to enhanced moral reasoning, better decision making, and more appropriate behavior.

 

MRT was initially developed in the 1980s as the cognitive-behavioral component in a prison-based therapeutic community.  Because of its remarkable success (notably with minority participants), the program was then tested and widely implemented in general inmate populations, with juvenile offenders, in parole and probation settings, community corrections, hospital and outpatient programs, educational settings, and in drug courts.  Measured objective outcomes were consistent in all settings.  The program leads to increased participation and completion rates, decreased disciplinary infractions, beneficial changes in personality characteristics, and significantly lower recidivism rates.  Unlike other program outcomes, MRT research shows that participation and program completion by minority groups can significantly lower long-term recidivism rates—for more than 20 years after treatment.  No other cognitive-behavioral treatment for offenders or substance abuse has shown such results.

 

All MRT groups must be operated by MRT-Certified facilitators, professional staff who have completed the 32-hour training program. MRT—Moral Reconation Therapy® is a Federally-registered trademark and state Servicemark of Eagle Wing Books, Inc. (Memphis, Tennessee).  Eagle Wing Books, Inc. publishes all MRT materials.

 

Correctional Counseling, Inc., of Germantown, Tennessee is the distributor of ATA and Eagle Wing Books Inc.'s printed treatment materials.

 

MRT is typically conducted in weekly groups, where clients present exercises from one of the workbooks that have been completed as homework.  Group facilitators use objective criteria to evaluate the participant's successful completion of each of the programs' steps.

 

A new cognitive-behavioral approach for life coaches and counselors who assist individuals and groups has also been developed and is available here.

To purchase products please visit Correctional Counseling, Inc., or call:

(901) 360-1564

 

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